Immuview® LEGIONELLA PNEUMOPHILA AND LEGIONELLA LONGBEACHAE

THE ONLY RAPID URINARY ANTIGEN TEST THAT DECTECT TWO TYPES OF LEGIONELLA WITH ONLY ONE TEST!

Legionella Longbeachae is the second most common Legionella species causing human infection1,2 

 In contrast to the well-known Legionella pneumophila, legionella Longbeachae is not found in water, but in soil  e.g. in potting mixes, compost heaps and composted animal manures3 shutterstock_352109249

 

EVALUATE AN IMMUVIEW TEST KIT

 

THE BENEFITS OF IMMUVIEW® 

With ImmuView® it is possible to detect Legionella in patient with presumed infection (Legionnaire’s disease) from either Legionella,  or Legionella Longbeachae, and thereby allows clinicians to initiate the correct antibiotic treatment to improve the outcome for the patient.

It only takes 3 simple steps to get results

ImmuView®  is easy to use as a stand alone test, or you can use it together with the ImmuView® Reader

 

WHY TEST FOR BOTH LEGIONELLA AND LEGIONELLA LONGBEACHAE?

  • Detect the two most common Legionella species in one go
  • First and only rapid test for the detection of Legionella Longbeachae
  • Initiate the correct antibiotic treatment to improve patient outcome
  • Broad detection ofL. pneumophilaserogroup 1 and non-serogroup 1
  • Easy to use test that does not require any special equipment
 

Note: NOT CLEARED FOR SALE IN THE US

Want to know more about ImmuView®? Send your question and we will get back to you

Legionella Longbeachae was discovered the first time in 1980 from a patient with pneumonia in Long Beach, California, USA, which is also the reason for the name “longebeachae”3

In contrast to Legionella pneumophila, Legionella Longbeachae is rarely isolated from aquatic environments. The primary environmental reservoir of L. Longbeachae remains unknown; but the major source of human infection is considered to be commercial potting mixes and other decomposing materials, such as bark and sawdust.  No reports of L. Longbeachae infection from water systems in the built environment have been confirmed3

The clinical symptoms of L. Longbeachae infections are similar to those of other legionellosis. Risk factors for infection in common with other Legionella infections are smoking, preexisting medical conditions, and immunosuppression.

Gardening activities and use of potting mixes are risk factors that are so far unique to L. Longbeachae infection. The disease predominantly affects persons <50 years of age, and reports suggest the median age for infection is slightly higher for L. Longbeachae than for L. pneumophila3

As with Legionella Pneumophila, the incubation period is between 2 to 10 days, but usually 5-6 days4

Legionnaires' disease is a severe, and often lethal form of pneumonia — which in around 90% of all cases is caused by the bacteria Legionella pneumophila.

The Legionella pneumophila bacteria is transmitted by water aerosols, and most people become infected when they inhale microscopic water droplets containing the bacteria

Legionnaires' disease usually develops from 2 to 10 days after being exposed to the bacteria. Most often the symptoms of Legionnaires diseases are high fever, headache, vomiting, muscle pain, and chills

 

Source: www.cdc.com, &  www.legionealla.org

Q: Is it possible to use urine samples where boric acid has been added?
A: Yes

Q: Is it possible to use the assay on samples from children under 7 years of age?
A: No, it has not been validated for samples from children under 7 years of age.

Q: The recommendation in our country is only to test for S. pneumoniae in urine. Why should we test for both?
A: We have combined the two tests as many guidelines recommended examining moderate and severe pneumonia cases for both. Furthermore, a study from Germany showed that the incidence of Legionella was higher than what is normally reported. The two bacteria require different antibiotics.

Q: The recommendation in our country is only to test for Legionella in urine. Why should we test for both?
A: We have combined the two test as many guidelines recommended examining moderate and severe pneumonia cases for both. Furthermore, Pneumococcus is the most frequent cause of pneumonia, and in most cases you will be able to treat it with penicillin. The two bacteria require different antibiotics.

Q: What is the "golden standard" for Pneumococcus and Legionella diagnostics?
A: The "golden standard" for pneumococcus is blood culture and for Legionella it is culture.

Q: Most children are vaccinated for Streptococcus pneumoniae. Does that have a “false positive” effect on the test?
A: We have not examined samples from children after vaccination, but we have looked at elderly (above 64 years) who have been vaccinated. 4 out of 24 were tested positive within the first 6 days. The 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine does not affect the ImmuView® S. pneumoniae and L. pneumophila Urinary Antigen Test. However, we do not recommend to use the test within three days after vaccinating with a 23-valent vaccination since false-positive results might occur. The test is not recommended for children under 7 years because of carriage of Pneumococcus.

Q: Positive control: is it a liquid positive control?
A: Yes, it is a liquid positive control. The positive control should, when tested, give three lines (Pneumococcus, Legionella and control line).

Q: Is the positive control for one or more tests?
A: There is enough for at least three tests if the customer wants to use to three tests on positive control.

Q: For how long have you had guidelines for control of both pathogens at the same time?
A: For approximately 10 years, the Danish guidelines have recommended to test for both pathogens if the patient is hospitalized with severe pneumonia.

Q: In our country people show more interest in Streptococcus pneumoniae than Legionella, why should we test for both?
A: We have combined the two test as many guidelines recommended examining moderate and severe pneumonia cases for both. Furthermore, a study from Germany showed that the incidence of Legionella was higher than what they normally reported.

Q: Is there a symptom that differentiate a Streptococcus pneumoniae and a Legionella infection?
A: No, the clinical symptoms are the same.

Q: Should you boil the positive samples?
A: The kit does not require boiling, but in some countries the sample is boiled to make a confirmation of the test result. But If the urine sample contains visible blood, please confirm a positive result by boiling the sample.

Q: Should the test be run with urine samples taken in the morning or can urine from any time of day be used?
A: Morning urine samples are to be preferred as the concentration of antigens will be highest in the morning. But the test can also be used with other urine samples.

Q: Is the test able to detect pneumococcus in synovial fluid?
A: The test has not been validated for use with synovial fluid

Urine samples:
The clinical sensitivity and specificity were obtained by testing retrospective culture verified urine samples.

Urine ImmuView® Sensitivity Other Rapid Tests Sensitivity
L. pneumophila SG1 (n=51) 75% (38/51) 67% (34/51) 
L. longbeachae (n=15) 67% (10/15) 0% (0/15)
Combined (n=20) 73% (49/67) 51% (34/67)


Overall specificity of the assay was 100% (213/213), test panels investigated were clinical urines diagnosed with: urinary tract infections, pneumococcal pneumonia and pneumonia symptoms.

Store at room temperature. Expiry date is printed on the package.

Article
number
Product  Number
of tests
Packing
98749 ImmuView® L. pneumophila and L. longbeachae Antigen Test 22 1 box

 

  1.  Currie S., L. and Beattie T., K. 2015; Perspectives in Public Health, Vol. 135, no.6 pp. 309-315.
  2. Kümpers P. et al, 2008; Journal of
    Medical Microbiology, Vol. 57, PP. 384-387
  3. Whiley, H. et. Al; Emerg Infect Dis. 2011 Apr; 17(4): 579–583.

  4. https://www.sahealth.sa.gov.au